Childrens Weight Diet And Exercise Health And Social Care Essay

This study focused on assessing the knowledge of overweight children in terms of body weight, diet and exercise. This chapter presents discussion of the main findings.

Demographic Characteristics of the experimental and control group

Table- I (a) and (b) presents the frequency and percentage distribution of sample based on demographic characteristics. In both the groups, majority 50% and 46.7% of children were under the age group of 12-14 years, Majority 66.7% – 76.7 % of children had Body Mass Index value between 25 and 27.5 and most of the families’ monthly income was above 10,000. All the children had televison in experimental group compared to 90% of children in control group. The table also reveals that most of the fathers were literate ranging from primary to graduate in both the groups and all the mothers were literate. Majority of the fathers in experimental group 50% and little less than half in control group 43.3% were working as private sector employees and Majority of the mothers in experimental group 56.7% and in control group 76.7% were non-working. There was an equal distribution of male and female children in the control group. In experimental group 60% were male and the rest were female. In experimental group, majority of children (63.3%) were non vegetarian and there was in reverse order in control group majority (53.3%) of children was vegetarian.

Assess the knowledge regarding body weight and its maintenance

Table II presents the distribution of samples in experimental and control group in three levels of knowledge on body weight and its maintenance before and after intervention.Majority of the samples 70% in the experimental group before intervention and 56.7% in the control group baseline observation had an average knowledge and remaining had poor knowledge. All the samples had good knowledge after intervention in experimental group. Unlike the experimental group, in the control group, the knowledge remained at average (63.3%) and poor (36.7%) level.

This table reveals that there is a marked increase in the experimental group atter intervention.

Table III presents the distribution of samples in experimental and control group in three levels of knowledge on various aspects of body weight and its maintenance before intervention. The various aspects include body weight, diet and exercise. In experimental group majority 16 – 21 samples had average knowledge and only 3 – 10 samples had either good or poor knowledge.

In control group, in the aspect of body weight 12 and 17(40% and 56.67%) of children had poor and average knowledge respectively and only one (3.33%) of child had good knowledge. In the aspect of diet 17 and 12(56.67% and 43.33%) of children had poor and average knowledge respectively and none of them had good knowledge. In the aspect of exercise 7, 14 and 9(23.33%, 46.67% and 30%) of children had poor, average and good knowledge respectively.

It appears that there is no marked difference in the number of samples in both groups with regard to the level of knowledge before intervention.

Table IV presents the distribution in three levels of knowledge on various aspects of body weight and its maintenance in experimental and control group after intervention. In experimental group majority 76.67 – 93.33% had good knowledge in all the three aspects, minimum (6.66 – 23.33%) children had average knowledge and none of the chilren had poor knowledge. In control group, 16.67%, 33.33% and 50% of the samples had poor knowledge with regard to body weight, diet and exercise respectively.

The increase in the number of samples with good knowledge in the experimental group reflects the effect of the knowledge gained from the self- instructional booklet.

The present study findings was supported by a study done by EPSTEIN, LEONARD H et.al (1996) it reveals that the results support the continued use of exercise in combination with diet for child and adolescent obesity treatment.

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Table V presents the mean knowledge score of experimental and control group on body weight before and after intervention.

The mean knowledge score of experimental and control group before intervention were 42.54% and 42.08% respectively. After the intervention the mean knowledge score of the experimental group increased to 74.85% while in control group the score decreased to 41%.

The difference observed was tested by using‘t’ test. Statistically there was no significant difference in the knowledge score between experimental and control group before intervention.

The present study findings was supported by a study done by U. Brook et.al study emphasizes that that an educational nutrition program should be given to pupils in school by physicians and dietitians during all the years of public school attendance.

Table VI presents the mean knowledge score of experimental and control group on diet before and after intervention. The mean knowledge score of experimental and control group before intervention were 38.07% and 35.5% respectively. After the intervention the mean knowledge score of the experimental group increased to 73.79% while in control group the score is only increased to 37.14%.

The difference observed was tested by using‘t’ test. Statistically there was no significant difference in the knowledge score between experimental and control group before intervention.

Table VII presents the mean knowledge score of experimental and control group on exercise before and after intervention. The mean knowledge score of experimental and control group before intervention were 54% and 50% respectively. After the intervention the mean knowledge score of the experimental group increased to 79.7% while in control group the score decreased to 46.77

The difference observed was tested by using‘t’ test. Statistically there was no significant difference in the knowledge score between experimental and control group before intervention.

Table VIII presents the mean overall knowledge score of experimental and control group on body weight and its maintenance before and after intervention. The mean knowledge score of experimental and control group before intervention were 43.97% and 41% respectively. After the intervention the mean knowledge score of the experimental group increased to 75.76% while in control group the score increased only to 41.08%.

The difference observed was tested by using‘t’ test. Statistically there was no significant difference in the knowledge score between experimental and control group before intervention.

Table IX presents the mean over all and various aspects of knowledge score of experimental group on body weight and its maintenance before and after intervention. In before intervention the mean over all and various aspects of knowledge score of experimental group was 38.07% to 54%. There is a marked increase in the knowledge after intervention (mean score 73.79% to 79.7%).

Statistically there is a significant difference of knowledge between before and after intervention. This increase in knowledge of the experimental group could be attributed to the self-instructional booklet.

The difference was tested by using‘t’ test. The hypothesis H2 "There will be a significant difference in the mean knowledge score of experimental group on body weight, diet and exercise before and after intervention" was accepted.

The present study was supported by a study done byThomas N. Robinson, MD, MPH (1999) it reveals that children in the intervention group had statistically significant relative decreases in body mass index, triceps skinfold thickness, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio.

Table X presents the mean over all and various aspects of knowledge score of control group on body weight and its maintenance before and after intervention.Statistically there was no significant difference in all the three aspects of knowledge in the control group.

The hypothesis Ho1 "There is no significant difference in the mean knowledge score in control group on body weight before and after intervention" was accepted.

3. Association of study variables and demographic variables

TABLE XI Presents the association and frequency distribution of demographic variables of experimental group with knowledge regarding body weight, diet and exercise. There is no association between the level of knowledge and selected demographic variables such as type of food, sex and age (P≤0.05).